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PSYCHOLOGY AND RELIGION
(Second Semester, 1998-99)
C. Harry Hui, Ph.D.
Department of Psychology
University of Hong Kong
Pokfulam Road
Hong Kong



This course is one that challenges students' thinking and conceptualization on materials related to various sub-disciplines in psychology and religion. Students are expected to have taken a few courses in psychology, and have some basic knowledge of at least one mainline or new religion.

Teaching schedule



Week of Wednesday Friday
Jan 11 Introduction

Batson et al, chap 1

Classical theories of religion Meadow and Kahoe, chap 30
Jan 18 Religious experience: Conversion

Batson et al, chap 2

Religious experience: Conversion

Batson et al, chap 4; Jeeves, Psychology and Christianity, chap 4: "Conversion: evaluating the psychological accounts"

Jan 25 Religious experience Religious Development

Batson et al, chap 3

Feb 1 Models of integration Models of integration

Myers, chaps 1-4

Feb 8 Human freedom and determinism

Myers, chaps 9-10

Human freedom and determinism; prayer

McCullough, M.E., Prayer and health: Conceptual issues, research review, and research agenda. JPT, 23, 1995, 15-29.

Feb 15 Chinese New Year Chinese New Year
Feb 22 Reading Week Reading Week
Mar 1 Religious orientation

Batson, chaps 5-6

(No class)
Mar 8 Religious orientation

Batson, chap 7

Demonization (Dr K W Hong)

Roski, C.H. (1997). When discernment fails: The case for outcome studies on exorcism. JPT, 25, 354-363.

Mar 15 Demonization (Dr K W Hong) Demonization (Dr K W Hong)
Mar 22 Religion and Mental Health Religious values in psychotherapy

Grimm, D.W. (1994). Therapist spiritual and religious values in psychotherapy. Counseling and Values, 38, 154-164.

Tjeltveit, A.C. (1992). The psychotherapist as Christian ethicist: Theology applied to practice. JPT, 20, 89-98.

Mar 29 New Age Movements Good Friday
Apr 5 New Age Movements Cults and New Religious Movements
Apr 12 Student presentation Student presentation
Apr 19 Student presentation




Reading assignments will be drawn from a variety of sources. You will also be referring to many chapters in a very useful book:

Batson, C.D., Schoenrade, P., & Ventis, W.L. (1993). Religion and the individual: A social-psychological perspective. NY: Oxford.



Lecturer

C. Harry Hui (K610; 2859 2291; huiharry_delete_this_@hkucc.hku.hk)



Coursework

1. Write a short position paper to summarize your current views about the relationship between psychology and religion. This assignment, which should not exceed 1,000 words in length, will be due in class on Jan 20, 1999. (10 points)

2. In addition to completing the reading assignments, each student will read a book of his/her own choice. The book should be at least 100 pages in length. The choice of the book should be finalized before Chinese New Year, in consultation with the instructor. After reading the book, you will

(a) Deliver an oral presentation drawing upon materials in the book. (Do not give a summary of the book!) Prepare a handout for your classmates. You will be graded on the content and style of your oral as well as written work. (25 points)

1. Write a book review. The review (maximum 2,500 words) is due at the beginning of the last class meeting. For format of your review, consult recent issues of Contemporary Psychology. (25 points)

Late submissions will be marked down by 10% for the first 90 minutes late, and 20% for every eight hours (or part thereof) thereafter.



Virtual Tutorials

Tutorials will be conducted virtually. You can join in the electronic discussion any time any day. Discussion in the virtual tutorials will initially be around the topics being dealt with in the current and preceding weeks, although any student may start a new line of discussion as appropriate.

The instructor's role is that of a moderator. That is, when discussions are going awry the instructor will try to help focus on the real issue; when people are silent the instructor will throw in a few provocative questions.

Log on to the discussion group at least twice every week. Allow enough time (at least 30 minutes for browsing and responding). When you log on, have your reading assignments on hand, so that you can refer to them, or be stimulated by the discussion to read them.

It will do neither you nor your classmates any good if you do not respond to the original postings, or not start a new line of discussion. While you are entitled to your own opinions, remember that the more valuable ones are well articulated, and often based on some experiences or some other authors' writings. Therefore, read at least some pages before logging on.

Keep your posted message short and concise, preferably within 15 lines. Sign your message so others know how to address you.

You will be graded on

how frequently and consistently you participate in discussion

how valuable is your contribution (e.g., the amount of discussion generated by your contribution)

Every two weeks or so you will receive a score on the quantity and quality of your contribution during that period. The score will be between 0 and 10, where 0 = non-participation, and 10 = extremely valuable contribution. The mark for the virtual tutorial will be the sum of the two highest scores and the two lowest scores. (40 points)







Weeks 1-2

Interface between psychology and religion

Models of integration

Meadow, M.J., & Kahoe, R.D. (1984). Psychology of religion: Religion in individal life. Chapter 30. Harper & Row. This chapter succinctly summarizes how different people view the relationship between the two. It serves as a good introduction to the course. A "must read" for everybody to begin the course.

Myers, D.G. (19xx). The human puzzle. Chapters 1-4.

Weeks 3-5

Religious conversion and religious experience

Sudden conversion and gradual conversion

Glossalalia

Meditation

Prayer

Batson 2-6

Jeeves, M.A. (1976). Psychology and Christianity: The view both ways. Chapter 8.

McCullough, M.E. (1995). Prayer and health: Conceptual issues, research review, and research agenda. Journal of Psychology and Theology, 23, 15-29.



Week 6, 8

Cults, occults, and the New Age Movement

Week 9-10

Demonization and mental illness

Rosik, C.H. (1997). When discernment fails: The case for outcome studies on exorcism. Journal of Psychology and Theology, 25, 354-363. (The author suggests that there is not much differences between possession and dissociative identity disorder.)

Week 11

Religious values in psychotherapy

Grimm, D.W. (1994). Therapist spiritual and religious values in psychotherapy. Counseling and Values, 38, 154-164.

Tjeltveit, A.C. (1992). The psychotherapist as Christian ethicist: Theology applied to practice. Journal of Psychology and Theology, 20, 89-98.


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